Friday, November 17, 2017

2018 Perennial Plant of the Year

Photo Credit: Walter's Gardens, Inc.

"The Perennial Plant Association has awarded the title Perennial Plant of the Year® 2018 to Allium ‘Millenium’. This herbaceous perennial, relative to the common onion, is a workhorse of the late summer garden. Bred by Mark McDonough, horticulture researcher from Massachusetts,

"...This cultivar is the result of a multigenerational breeding program involving Allium nutans and A. lusitanicum (formerly Allium senescens ssp montanum), selected for late flowering with masses of rose-purple blooms, uniform habit with neat shiny green foliage that remains attractive season long, and for its drought-resistant constitution.

"Allium ‘Millenium’ has numerous virtues to add to the landscape setting. Growing best in full sun, each plant typically produces an upright foliage clump of grass-like, glossy deep green leaves reaching 10-15” tall in spring. In midsummer, two to three flower scapes rise above the foliage with each scape producing two or three showy two-inch spherical umbels of rose-purple florets that last as long as four weeks. The flower umbels are completely round (spherical), not domed or hemispherical as they are in some Allium species.  They dry to a light tan often holding a blush of their former rose-purple color.  While other alliums can look scraggly in the heat of the summer, ‘Millenium’ does not let the heat bother it!  Easily grown in zones 4-9 (possibly zone 3) makes it a great perennial in many areas of the country.  In very hot summer climates it does appreciate afternoon shade."

Return to goGardenNow.com

Thursday, November 9, 2017

The Peggy Lee Hahn Horticulture Garden



The Peggy Lee Hahn Horticulture Garden covers almost six acres of plant displays on the campus of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Virginia. It was established in 1984 by faculty members of the Horticulture department to serve as a resource for plant, landscaping and environmental education.

The garden featuring perennial borders, aquatic gardens, shade gardens, a native meadow, and a pavilion was named in 2004 after benefactors T. Marshall and Peggy Lee Hahn (1923-2009). T. Marshall Hahn (1926-2016) was president of Virginia Tech from 1962 to 1974.

Ms. Hahn is dearly remembered in her obituary. “During her marriage to Dr. Hahn, she was a successful and much loved First Lady throughout his presidency at Virginia Tech from 1962 to 1975. Her love of flowers and gardening is legendary, evidenced by her determination to see the Peggy Lee Hahn Horticulture Gardens and Pavilion at Virginia Tech brought to fruition. The embodiment of a gracious lady and consummate hostess, she spent many years at her husband's side while he served as President and CEO of Georgia Pacific in Portland, Ore., and Atlanta, Ga. After retirement, they enjoyed traveling around the world, but ultimately returned to Blacksburg and Hickory Hill, which she often referred to as ‘the most beautiful place on earth’ where her greatest joys were tending her gardens and spending time with her family.”

The Hahn Horticulture Garden is set in the magnificent campus of Virginia Tech. In my opinion, the real beauty of the campus is due to the Hokie Stone, a local limestone that forms the facades of most VT buildings. To ensure a ready supply, the university has owned and operated its own quarry nearby since 1869.




Visitors can reach the Hahn Horticulture Garden without difficulty, with the possible exception being “game days”. Any season is a good season to stroll the garden.

Follow me to see what grows behind that garden wall.




























Return to goGardenNow.com.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Kwanso Daylilies Still Blooming

It's September 28 and the Kwanso daylilies are still in bloom.


Return to Hemerocallis at goGardenNow.com.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Woulda, coulda, shoulda planted Spanish Bluebells



 Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

It was early spring and I was walking through a wood near Munich.  Gray clouds had induced in me a pensive mood, when I came upon a clump of bluebells.  The forest at once became enchanted.  In the words of Bronte, they "seemed like fairy gifts."  Such was my first experience with these delightful plants.

Bluebells require very little maintenance.  They are wonderful for bulb gardens, perennial gardens, container gardens as well as for naturalizing in meadows, around the margins of lawns, and in woodlands. 

Buy bluebell bulbs today at goGardenNow.com.

Riverbanks Zoo and Botanical Garden



 Since opening in April 1974, Riverbanks Zoo and Garden has become one of the most successful mid-sized zoos in the United States, winning awards for exhibit design and animal conservation efforts. Original features included the moated exhibits for cats, bears, giraffes and rhinos, exhibits for small mammals and the 22,000-square-foot Ecosystem Birdhouse. My oh my, how it has grown!

Riverbanks, located at Columbia, SC, attracts more than 1.2 million visitors annually. That’s more than the population of Columbia Metropolitan area which is home to about 810,000 souls. It’s an easy 2 to 2-1/2 hour drive from cities such as Savannah, Charleston, Asheville, Charlotte, Fayetteville, and Myrtle Beach.

In the early 1960s, some local businessmen conceived the idea of a small community zoo for children. The initial effort was doomed, but the idea didn’t die. In 1969 the South Carolina General Assembly created the Rich-Lex Riverbanks Park Special Purpose District governed by a seven-member commission. By doing so, two counties joined the city of Columbia in the project. Approximately 100 acres of land on the Saluda River outside the city limits were leased to the commission by South Carolina Electric and Gas (SCE&G) for 99 years at $1.00 per year.

The property is also the site of several interesting historical landmarks and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Points of interest date back to the early 1800s with South Carolina’s textile industry and the War for Southern Independence.

Construction of Riverbanks Botanical Garden began in 1994 and opened in the summer of 1995. It’s connected to the zoo by an 800-foot-long bridge over the scenic Saluda River. The Garden includes a large visitor center, a formal walled garden, an antique rose garden, an education center and a half-mile long nature trail along the riverbank. Visitors may access the Garden by walking or taking a motorized tram.

A recent addition is a modest water park adjacent to the Botanical Garden. Together with the zoo, Riverbanks is a great place to spend a day.

Follow along to see what grows behind the garden wall.

Edgeworthia chrysantha (foreground)

Crapemyrtle allee

Mixed bulb, annual, perennial planting

Hyacinthoides hispanica

Riverbanks Botanical Garden View

Riverbanks Botanical Garden View

Stauntonia hexaphylla

Bignonia capreolata

Rose arbor

Return to goGardenNow.com.

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Woulda, coulda, shoulda planted Hyacinths



Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

Hyacinths are ever-popular bulbs for garden and indoor forcing. The large flowers and heady fragrance are well-known to gardeners and non-gardeners alike. Even children come to know them.

The name is said to have been inspired by a much-loved young athlete, Hyakinthos, who was hit and killed by a stray discus while foolishly trying to catch it. Of course, the discus was not blown off course by accident; Zephyr did it. The flowers miraculously sprouted from the blood of Hyakinthos.

Since that time, safer plastic discs have been developed. Still, Zephyr is often blamed for bad throws in disc golf.

Choose your hyacinth varieties at goGardenNow.com.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Planted - Crocuses

Crocus vernus - mixed colors

Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

Crocuses are among the earliest harbingers of spring.  Like little jewels, they sprinkle the dark moist earth and bring joy to those who find them.  "O, look!  A crocus!  And look, there are more!"

Name(s): Crocus vernus.

Flower Color: Mixed.

Bloom Time: Early spring.

Foliage: Herbaceous, green.

Height/Spread: Approximately 4 inches.

Climate Zones: 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.

Soil Condition: Average, well-drained, pH 6.1 - 7.85

Planting Depth: 2 inches to 3 inches.

Features: Deer-resistant.

Uses: Perfect for container gardens and bulb gardens.

Return to Crocus at goGardenNow.com.

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Planted - 'Ambiance' Amaryllis

Amaryllis 'Ambiance'


Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

The genus Hippeastrum (pronounced "hip-ee-ASS-trum") is native to sub-tropical and tropical areas of South America and the Caribbean. The name is formed from two Greek words referring to "cavalry" and "star." It is theorized that the man who named it in 1837, the Reverend William Herbert, was thinking that the flower resembled a weapon used by medieval knights.


Name(s): Hippeastrum 'Ambiance'.

Flower Color: White with red stripes.

Foliage: Herbaceous.

Height: Up to 18 inches.

Climate Zones: Hardy in zones 9, 10, 11.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.

Soil Condition: Organic, well-drained, pH 6.1 to 7.8.

Planting Depth: 6 inches.

Features: Size 34+ cm in circumference. Photo color is approximate.

Uses: Forcing, bulb gardens where hardy.

Return to Hippeastrum at goGardenNow.com.

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Planted - 'Globemaster' Ornamental Garlic

Allium 'Globemaster'

Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

Ornamental Allium has shiny, glossy foliage and produces 12" - 48" high leafless stalks upon which sit tufted globes of color. The late spring and early summer blooms typically have great potential for cut flower production. The blooms last much longer in a vase than your typical flower. This plant attracts bees, butterflies and birds, but disinterests deer and rodents. It doesn't have any pest problems.

Allium x 'Globemaster' was raised in 1971 by J. Bijl. The flower ball can be over 8 inches across. Like other ornamental allium, they appear exotic, but are easy to grow.

Name(s): Allium x 'Globemaster', Giant Onion, Giant Allium.

Flower Color: Purple.

Bloom Time: Late spring, early summer.

Foliage: Herbaceous, blue-green, smooth, fragrant.

Height/Spread: 48 inches x 15 inches.

Climate Zones: 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.

Soil Condition: Well-drained, average, pH 6.6 to 7.8.

Planting Depth: 8 inches.

Features: Deer resistant, fragrant.

Uses: Massed planting, cutting gardens, container gardens, bulb gardens, butterfly gardens, herb gardens, borders.

Return to Allium at goGardenNow.com.

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Planted - Grape Hyacinths (Muscari)

Muscari armeniacum


Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

Muscari armeniacum, also known as grape hyacinths, are native to Asia Minor. They are wonderful little plants that are very easy to grow and highly adaptable. Muscari are excellent for bulb gardens, perennial gardens, container gardens, rock gardens, mass plantings, or naturalized areas. They look best when planted in large groups. Flowering is mid spring.


Name(s): Muscari armeniacum, Grape Hyacinth.

Flower Color: Blue.

Bloom Time: Mid-spring

Foliage: Herbaceous.

Height/Spread: 10 inches x 5 inches.

Climate Zones: Hardy in zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.

Soil Condition: Organic, well-drained, pH 6.1 to 7.8.

Planting Depth: 3 inches to 5 inches.

Features: Abundant flowers.

Uses: Bulb gardens, rock gardens, mass plantings, naturalizing, container gardens.

Return to Muscari at goGardenNow.com.

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Planted - Blue Anemones

Anemone blanda Blue Shades


Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

Anemone blanda is native to Mediterranean regions. Flowers are among the daintiest in spring. Also known as Grecian Windflowers, they will give you a carpet of spring color.

Name(s): Anemone blanda, Grecian Windflower.

Flower Color: Blue.

Bloom Time: Early spring.

Foliage: Herbaceous.

Height/Spread: 6 inches to 12 inches x 6 inches.

Climate Zones: 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.

Soil Condition: Average, pH 5.6 to 7.8.

Planting Depth: 2-1/2 times the height of the bulb.

Features: Blue flowers.

Uses: Rock gardens, mass plantings, naturalizing.

Return to Anemones at goGardenNow.com.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Planted - 'Cheerfulness' Narcissus

Narcissus 'Cheerfulness'


Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

Narcissus 'Cheerfulness' was raised in 1923 by J.B. Van der Schoot, and is considered to be an heirloom variety.

Name(s): Narcissus 'Cheerfulness'.

Flower Color: White/yellow.

Bloom Time: Late season

Foliage: Herbaceous.

Height: 14 inches.

Climate Zones: Hardy in zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.

Soil Condition: Organic, well-drained, pH 6.1 to 7.8.

Planting Depth: 2-1/2 times the height of the bulb.

Features: Double cup. Deer resistant.

Uses: Naturalizing, cutting, perennial gardens, bulb gardens, container gardens.

Return to Narcissus at goGardenNow.com.

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Planted - 'Kees Nelis' Tulip

 Tulip Kees Nelis

Come spring, lots of folks slap themselves on the forehead saying, "I woulda, coulda, shoulda planted ____." You fill in the blank. If only they had planted those flower bulbs in fall, they would be enjoying them in spring. Here is one of my favorites that you should plant now.

Name(s): Tulipa 'Kees Nelis'.

Flower Color: Red/yellow.

Bloom Time: Mid-season.

Foliage: Herbaceous.

Height: 18 inches.

Climate Zones: Hardy in zones 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.

Sun Exposure: Full sun.

Soil Condition: Organic, well-drained, pH 6.1 to 7.8.

Planting Depth: 2-1/2 times the height of the bulb.

Features: Deer resistant.

Uses: Cutting, container gardens, bulb gardens, borders.

Return to Tulips at goGardenNow.com.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

How to Determine If A Plant Is Edible


Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia) fruit.


I don’t claim to be a fanatical foodie, though I love to cook and eat. But I am fairly serious about food, particularly native plants. My impressive credentials include:

One question that often enters my mind when eating any herb, spice, fruit or vegetable is, “How did someone decide THIS would be a good thing to eat?” Was it tested on "Mikey" first?



Kirsten Rechnitz, Head Instructor at Boulder Outdoor Survival School (Utah) suggests the following test for edibility if you’re in a survival situation where you have to subsist on mice and a few greens.

“The first thing you want to do is take a tiny bit of it and rub it on the inside of your wrist. And then you want to wait a number of hours to see if you have a reaction. If you don’t have a reaction…take the tiniest of bites, put it on your tongue, leave it there for a few seconds and then spit it out, and then rinse with some water. See what happens after a few hours, if you have anything going on. If you don’t, then maybe you want to take a tiny piece, chew on it, actually swallow it, take it down with some water. If you don’t have a reaction within a few hours, go for a small but larger gathering of that plant. Have that, then wait a full day and see what your system actually does. Anything like diarrhea, …itchy throat, ...stomach ache. Maybe that food isn’t actually poisonous, but it’s new to your body and if it’s causing you harm, you probably shouldn’t be eating it.”

That's one way it's done; courage born of starvation. Sylvester Stallone once remarked, “When I was a kid, my mother used to feed me mashed-potato sandwiches, Brussels sprout sandwiches; my brain cells were starving from lack of food. I'll eat anything. I'll eat dirt.”

Or, determining whether something is edible or delicious, even, can be born of an adventurous spirit.

There isn't anything I don't eat, although I'm not too keen on creepy crawly things. Other than that, I'm quite adventurous.  - Cherie Lunghi (Actress)

Return to goGardenNow.com

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

FAQ: How can I tell if my holly is dead?


I transplanted a large Fleming holly in the spring. Soon afterward the leaves turned brown and fell off. I've been watering and fertilizing it, but I believe it's dead. I hate to dig it up unless I'm positively sure. How can I tell if it's truly dead?

With a pocket knife or your fingernail, scratch several places on the stems, starting at the top and working downward. If you see green beneath, it's still alive at that point. If it's brown, cut it off.

Even if the cambium is green, the plant might eventually die. But if you care enough to keep it, continue watering when needed. Don't add fertilizer. Keep an eye out for tiny vegetative buds forming and leaves emerging. It's still possible your holly will survive.

Return to goGardenNow.com.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Foundation Shrubs for Home Security





In my recent article, Ten Simple Landscaping Ideas for Home/Land Security, the first two safety precautions were: 
  1. Choose low-growing foundation and border shrubs. (Low-profile shrubs require less pruning to keep them in bounds);
  2. Prune foundation shrubs to 3 feet high. (This might be necessary if you are working with an existing planting.)

The reason should be obvious; home intruders prefer to do evil in secret than in plain view.

Here are two examples.
This one shows a clean foundation planting with few places to hide.

This one exhibits a foundation planting that practically hides the house.

Which home would you choose to burgle? (Don’t get any ideas, now. Google is watching you!)

Some examples of low-growing shrubs include:

This is by no means an exhaustive list.
Don’t think that tall plants are always excluded. If they're narrow, they don't provide such good places to hide. Some fine examples include:


Foundation shrubs such as these will help to make your home a safer place for yourself and your family.

Return to goGardenNow.com.