Tuesday, February 24, 2015

FAQ: How many Liriope spicata plants do I need?

I have about 1,200 sqf area in the backyard to cover with Liriope spicata. It will replace the existing bermuda fescue turf. The goal is to produce a tidy, formal look and dense cover. I'd prefer potted plants of a sufficiently large size. I am looking at at least six vendors and you are one of them I have contacted. Please advise me on:
  •     How many plants do I need?
  •     When would be the best time to plant them, considering my location and zone (Norman, OK zone 6B)?
  •     Considering the large size of the area to be covered, what would be your best, competitive price?

The planting distance depends on your budget and how quickly you want the plants to grow together and cover the area. They will cover more quickly if spaced closer. You must balance one against the other.

You may plant those from 2-1/2 inch pots as closely as 8 inches apart, or as distant as 12 inches apart. You may plant those from 3-1/2 inch pots as closely as 12 inches apart, or as distant as 18 inches apart.

Plant spacing is measured from the center of one pot to the center of the next pot.

If you plant at 8 inch spacing, you will need 2.25 plants per square foot.
If you plant at 10 inch spacing, you will need 1.45 plants per square foot.
If you plant at 12 inch spacing, you will need 1 plant per square foot.
If you plant at 15 inch spacing, you will need .64 plant per square foot.
If you plant at 18 inch spacing, you will need .44 plant per square foot.

This is a link to the Liriope spicata in 2-1/2 inch pots showing quantity discounts: https://www.gogardennow.com/grasses/liriope/liriope-spicata-2-1-2-inch-pots.html

This is a link to the Liriope spicata in 3-1/2 inch pots showing quantity discounts: https://www.gogardennow.com/grasses/liriope/liriope-spicata-3-1-2-inch-pots.html

If you have irrigation available, plant in spring when danger of frost is past. If you do not have irrigation available, I suggest you wait until fall when natural rainfall is usually more abundant.

Return to goGardenNow.com.

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