Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Foam is bubbling out of my Chinese elm. Any ideas?



Foam is bubbling out of my Chinese elm. Any ideas?

The foam is called "slime flux." It occurs sometimes when a tree is wounded and sap is exuded. Bacteria growing in the sap causes it to ferment and foam. Insects might be attracted to it to feed. Before long you have a stinky mess. If left untreated, the slime mold can weaken the tree to the point of death.

To treat it, remove any bark that may be covering the wound, then wipe away as much of the slime mold as possible. Brush the area with rubbing alcohol or a dilution of plain household bleach and water - 1 part bleach to 9 parts water. You will probably have to repeat the treatment several times to keep the slime flux in check.

Tree wounds may result from pathogens such as those that cause cankers. More often, mechanical damage from string trimmers, lawn mowers, garden tools and poor pruning cause wounds.

Prevention is the best medicine. Try to keep your plants in good health, and avoid mechanical damage.

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Winter gardening tips?

Do you have any winter gardening tips?

Yes. Think spring. When you do, you'll be ready for it. Here are some specifics, which should come as no surprise:

  • Put your summer garden to bed;
  • Reflect on the past year's gardening experience, taking note of your successes and failures to learn from them;
  • Dream about something new you'd like to do in the garden, research and plan for it, or forget about it if it won't work;
  • Peruse seed catalogs when they arrive in the mail, make a wish-list before you fill out the order forms, then face the fact you don't have room in your garden for all that, and shorten the list;
  • Clean and sharpen your tools so you won't be kicking yourself come spring because you didn't do it before;
  • Winterize your gas-powered tools, so you won't be kicking yourself come spring when you're taking them to the shop for carburetor repairs;
  • Continue adding to your compost pile;
  • Read blog articles at goGardenNow.blogspot.com.

Return to goGardenNow.com.

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Savannah Botanical Garden, Savannah, GA

Savannah Botanical Garden


Escape the frenzy of mid-town Savannah, GA in the Savannah Botanical Garden. Begun in the late 1980s as a cooperative volunteer effort by local garden clubs, Savannah Botanical Garden provides a peaceful place for reflection. It's easy to miss, however.

Savannah Botanical Garden is located on Eisenhower Drive, a busy four-lane east-to-west thoroughfare. In a hurry like the others, I barely noticed it for over 20 years.

Visitors to the garden are first invited to enter the historic Reinhard house, a 19th century farmhouse. It's one of only two surviving antebellum farmhouses remaining in the  Savannah area. The charming Reinhard house, built of heart pine with gingerbread trim, has been moved twice; first to make way for a cemetery, last to make way for Truman Parkway. Today, the Reinhard house serves as an office, gift shop, and venue for events such as weddings.
Historic Reinhard House, Savannah Botanical Garden
The garden features nature trails, a two-acre pond, formal herb parterre, perennial garden, fern collection, vegetable garden, native plant collection and the Ann Douglas White Memorial Rose Garden. Seasonal attractions include the exuberant floral beauty of azaleas in spring, and wonderful camellias in bloom throughout fall and winter. Members of participating garden clubs are responsible for the various garden areas.


Any day is a good day to visit Savannah Botanical Gardens. Whether rain or shine, every season displays something of beauty. Admission is free, though donations are happily accepted.


Hydrangea serrata 'Fuji Waterfall'
Pond, Savannah Botanical Garden
Basin, Savannah Botanical Garden
Garden walk, Savannah Botanical Garden
Children's garden, Savannah Botanical Garden
Children's garden, Savannah Botanical Garden

Return to goGardenNow.com.